Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Extra! Extra! Read all about it! Weed Magic in stores October 4th!

WEED MAGIC WILL BE A MASSIVE HIT AS
COMIC BOOK SHOPS AND ONLINE RETAILERS
PREPARE FOR OCTOBER 4th STREET SALES
RED EYES. FULL BONG. CAN’T LOSE.

Looking for that new collectible buzz title in your neighborhood comic book shop? WEED MAGIC will be a huge hit when it is available for street sales beginning October 4th. The new comic book is prescribed entertainment that every collector will want to have on their top shelf.  
Let’s be blunt, there has never been a comic book about the unique super powers unleashed by a mystical, magical super strain of cannabis  — until now. Bliss on Tap, the HIGHLY respected independent producer and publisher of original comic books and graphic novels is sure to score with WEED MAGIC, a fun tale of two best buds looking for kush on the most celebrated day of the year for stoners and recreational marijuana users all around the world, 4/20. 
But when these two best friends in need wait too long and they discover the entire supply in the city is sold out, they must decide what price they are truly willing to pay for a bag of green that when smoked gives them true super powers and changes their lives forever. 
Written by Brian Phillipson and Jordan Lichtman with art by Alex Cormack, WEED MAGIC will roll out to comic book stores worldwide starting October 4 and be available digitally on all major distribution platforms, including Amazon, Apple iTunes, Hoopla, Comixology, Google, Scribd, Nook, Drivethrucomics and many more, so seek and ye’ shall find and all for the correctly priced suggested retail cost of $4.20. 
For fans attending New York Comicon, Bliss on Tap will be featuring WEED MAGIC at booth 945, so show up and ask for the special strain of mystic for a special free collectible??? 
“We have been life-long comic book fans and it was a joint decision to write a comic that weed like to see in stores,” said Jordan Lichtman, who by day is assistant general counsel for one of Hollywood’s leading studios.
Brian Phillipson,  president and co-founder of Bliss on Tap Publishing, added, “Some superheroes get their powers after getting bit. Ours get their powers after taking a giant hit. It’s high time that there was a comic book about the super powers unleashed by smoking a mystical, exotic strain of cannabis.”
Since its inception, Bliss on Tap has established a reputation as a producer and publisher of premium comic book and graphic novel content with taut and engaging narrative structures and the highest quality artwork. WEED MAGIC continues that tradition. Founded in 2004 by writer Brian Phillipson and animator Phil Phillipson, Bliss on Tap Publishing spans a wide variety of genres and targeted audiences, from sci-fi titles “Future Proof” and “Hardcore Henry,” comedy titles “Weed Magic,” “But Like Maybe?” and “God the Dyslexic Dog” to horror with “Train 8: The Zombie Express” and “Killing Hope.”

Weed Magic gets 10 out of 10 from ComicGrinder.com

Click here for the link
Review by Henry Chamberlain

Cannabis humor is tricky. The subject comes with its own unique background that easily attracts goofy humor. It can also definitely have redeeming quality. I’m talking about overall quality and craft. In movies, think: Cheech & Chong. Seth Rogen and James Franco. In comics, think: Robert Crumb. Simon Hanselmann. If you are really cool and smart about it, you can succeed with goofy jokes about pot. WEED MAGIC, published by Bliss on Tap Publishing, is a new comic book series that gives it a try. Let’s take a closer look.
Here’s the deal: you are already preaching to the choir when you create a cannabis comic so you really don’t need to overstate your case. That is a big challenge to contend with. And, to be fair, you are also dealing with a variety of opinions and tastes. Some people think Kevin Smith is spot on with his cannabis humor and some think not so much. It does seem that people can get way too caught up in proving that they have cannabis cred and that they’re up for the most wildest of misadventures. In general, less is more. Some people think more is not enough. At first, I was leaning towards this being a problem for this comic. Attempts at going full-on Mary Jane can fall short and feel too generic and calculated. But, after careful consideration, I say this comic grows on me.
Two friends just getting by…
The narrative steadily takes form and the reader can expect to roll with the offbeat humor. This is light entertainment done right. This is written by Brian Phillipson and Jordan Lichtman with art by Alex Cormack. Brian Phillipson is the president and co-founder of Bliss on Tap Publishing. It is easy for readers to take for granted the hard work involved in creating something that falls in the light humor category. But this is a sharp and well-executed smooth read. The dynamic use of color by Cormack is in step with the pace and humor. We’re in good hands down to spot on lettering by Alex Murillo.
…then, one day, they stumble upon a big bag of magic weed.
The story does a good job of playing off the typical superhero origin story. Set in Los Angeles, in Hollywood, we follow two friends as they discover their true destiny. Bunny Cortez dreams of making it big as a filmmaker. Moe Green is more down to earth as a law clerk on a fast track to becoming an attorney. But both of these guys are not happy, at least not as happy as they’d like to be. Until, one day, they stumble upon a big bag of magic weed. Hey, I could see this attracting the attention of Seth Rogen and James Franco or the next wave of talent that aspire to be Rogen and Franco. It could happen. Lastly, we’re just discussing the first issue here. From what I see, I am intrigued and look forward to the collected trade. All in all, a strong first issue. Seek this out.
Rating: 10/10

WEED MAGIC is available as of October 4: digitally on all major distribution platforms, including Amazon, Apple iTunes, Hoopla, Comixology, Google, Scribd, Nook, and Drivethrucomics. And for fans attending New York Comic Con (October 5-8), Bliss on Tap will be featuring WEED MAGIC at booth 945 along with a special collectible.

Tuesday, September 05, 2017

New Yorker Magazine: A Cartoonist’s Jaundiced View of Modern Womanhood

A Cartoonist’s Jaundiced View of Modern Womanhood

On Instagram, But Like Maybe’s heroine is wide-eyed and frantic—because of an unreturned text, a hankering for vodka, or an imminent bad choice.

By

Arianna Margulis - Illustration by Tom Bachtell
Last summer, reposted images of a girl-about-town, drawn in Sharpie, began proliferating on Instagram. Invariably, the girl is wide-eyed and frantic—because of an unreturned text, a hankering for vodka, or an imminent bad choice. (“Me debating who I should go home with,” reads the caption of one cartoon, an ex-boyfriend in one thought bubble, a slice of pizza in another.) The drawings appear daily on the Instagram account But Like Maybe, a “Cathy” for our device-driven times. One imagines its creator, Arianna Margulis, sipping a pink drink on a flamingo floaty—this summer, she posted an image with her character doing just that. Ah, the good life of a young artist, a hundred and forty-five thousand Instagram followers and counting.
Life on dry land is kind of, like, different. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Margulis works as a shop assistant at an Upper East Side boutique, rearranging tableaux of three-thousand-dollar handbags. The store, Hayward House, is owned by Marin Hopper, the daughter of Dennis Hopper and Brooke Hayward, and Hopper’s husband, the film producer John Goldstone. “Sometimes I’ll be up here late, sitting on the floor, drawing, putting some bags out,” Margulis said the other day at the store, which occupies two floors of a town house, where the owners live. A reedy thirtyish blonde, she wore a puffy green jacket with “But Like Maybe” scrawled on the back and a tan cowboy hat. “Then Marin will call me down to her apartment and be, like, ‘Are you hungry? Can I feed you?’ ”
Hopper and Goldstone found out about their employee’s side hustle only when their teen-age daughter came running in one day holding up her iPhone; she’d just figured out that Margulis was behind her favorite Instagram account.
“I was, like, ‘What are you talking about?’ ” Goldstone said. He and Hopper took a closer look. “Then I was, like, ‘This is fucking awesome. It’s so hilarious and smart and unusual.’ I told Arianna, ‘You have this hidden talent!’ ” Hopper and Goldstone immediately decided that their shop’s luxury wares might benefit from a bit of scribbly patina. They asked Margulis to doodle on reproductions of Dennis Hopper’s black-and-white photographs—blue squiggles on a young Paul Newman, cartoony Hayward handbags draped around naked women—which they are considering selling next season. “As much as my father was very specific about how he liked his pictures printed and never cropped and da-da-da, I know that he would be excited to see her spirit and youth come through—like a young Banksy!” Hopper said. “We’re thinking of continuing it as limited editions, or on T-shirts. It could be fabulous!”
Margulis said, “To which I’m, like, ‘Really?’ ”

“She’s an inspiration to us,” Hopper went on. “I feel so lucky, and I’m always going, ‘Please, don’t ever leave!’ ” The newest plan was for Margulis to Sharpie on a white Hayward bag and wear it to Fashion Week.
After work, Margulis walked to the No. 6 train to head down to her East Village walkup. Born in Michigan, she moved to Manhattan after college, seeking a career in fashion and Mr. Right. She admits to being something of a stalker. “The guys who ran should have run away from me,” she said. “If I got some creepy, drunk, confessional love poem via e-mail at 3 a.m., I’d probably run, too.”
Two years ago, after a boyfriend dumped her because she interfered with his meditation schedule, Margulis started sketching furiously, and uploaded snapshots of her work to Instagram. Although she has a jaundiced view of the dilemmas of the modern single woman—“Siri, will he text me?”—her avatar is ever hopeful, always up for another night out, a sprinkle-covered doughnut, or a two-hundred-dollar bathing suit that she can’t afford. (The day after Trump’s election, she slung her arm around the Statue of Liberty, held a pink drink aloft, and declared, “We are going to be O.K.”)
The floors of Margulis’s tiny apartment slant slightly downward. Airplane bottles of tequila sit atop a loudly humming refrigerator. “I joke that Mickey is always around,” she said, surveying the corners. “I think, for now, he’s hiding.”
Margulis calls her yearly earnings from her comic “margarita money.” (It’s in the thousands.) Last year, a small press published a short run of But Like Maybe comic books. More recently, Capitol Records recruited her to take over its Instagram account in order to chronicle the MTV Video Music Awards. And Creative Artists Agency signed her, with the goal of bringing But Like Maybe to television. “The dream is that the show would be the big payoff,” she said. She has incorporated sponsors like Smirnoff vodka and a dating app called Huggle into her strip, but she’s turned down other deals in the name of artistic integrity.
Margulis has been in a stable relationship for a year now, and she’s experiencing life on the other side of the dating divide. “I’ve had all these old boyfriends coming out of the woodwork, texting me, ‘Is this one about me?’ ” she said. “I’m, like, ‘Totally.’ Like, ‘Yeah, remember? Asshole.’ ” ♦
This article appears in other versions of the September 11, 2017, issue, with the headline “Comic.”

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

WEED MAGIC (AUG171292) - now available to order through Diamond Comics!

WEED MAGIC (AUG171292): Hollywood, California. It's 4/20 and two lovable stoners - Moe and his best friend Bunny - find themselves (and the whole city) completely dry. When local vagabond My$tic gifts the boys a strange and exotic strain of cannabis (along with a cryptic warning), Moe and Bunny soon discover that this 'magic' weed provides potent yet fleeting super-human powers of body and mind. The love child of iPineapple Express/i and iThe Greatest American Hero/i, iWeed Magic/i will delight the sober and stoned alike. Red Eyes. Full Bong. Can't Lose.



Friday, June 09, 2017

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

It was an incredible honor to have helped distribute the @valerianmovie comic last month for free comic book day. This is going to be a mind-blowing movie by @lucbesson ...can't wait for everyone to check it out July 21st! And stop by our Bliss on Tap booth at San Diego Comic Con for a free copy! Thanks @kevinschwoer @stxentertainment











Monday, May 08, 2017

Highbrow.com interview with "But Like Maybe?" writer Dru Radovich

click here for the article
Dru Radovich of STX Entertainment- also 1/2 of the cult comic brand but Like Maybe- talks defying the job-odds without a Bachelor’s Degree, using comics and T.V. as a vehicle to address uncomfortable topics, and being O.K. with not knowing all the answers.
How she turned a dream internship into a real job:
“I started in film at Endgame Entertainment. I was a baby intern, and I was also the intern who would never leave [laughs]. After the summer, I wanted to stay, so they promoted me to receptionist where I was assisting three people and also running the intern program. It was funny because I was so young, younger than a lot of the potential interns who were interviewing.”
Her open-mindedness is how she found her place in the industry:
“When I was ready to leave Endgame, another intern I knew had moved over to Universal Pictures, and she put my resume up for Adam Fogelson’s desk, who was the Chairman of Universal at the time. I had no idea who he was when I walked into his office, but luckily we fell in professional love [laughs]. The competition, especially somewhere like Universal, is insane. There are graduates from all the Ivy Leagues with amazing resumes, and here I was, this Santa Barbara City College kid.
I moved over to NBC to work in Digital for a bit, and that was around the time Adam joined STX Entertainment, so I ended up following him there. I’m really big on loyalty! I jumped back into film while working on his desk again, and now two years later, I’m back in Digital and T.V. Film was always so glamorous, and I felt like I belonged there. I loved all the fun people I got to interact with, but I never found the perfect fit in that genre. Digital wasn’t a path I saw for myself, but I’m such a Digital kid, so once I embraced it, I knew it was where I was supposed to be.”
One hip hop class was the reason she ended up partnering with Arianna on But Like Maybe:
“As for my side-hustle, I have my But Like Maybe endeavors. At STX, my coworker Brian Phillipson is a publisher and has a comic book company. He asked if I’d ever want to write for one of his comics, and that same day, I’d been creeping on Arianna’s [founder of @butlikemaybe] Instagram. I didn’t have her phone number, we were just friends on Facebook after we took a hip hop class together a while ago [laughs], so I sent her a Facebook message asking if she’d be interested, and she said yes. What’s so funny is neither of us has any business creating comic books. I did the graphic design [for the books], and I had to completely teach myself how to do the whole thing using this crazy software. I still don’t even know how it works [laughs].
The Instagram @butlikemaybe is all Arianna, but anything that is plot-driven, like the comics, is the two of us together. When I was first looking at the Instagram, all I could think is, “What’s this girls’ story? She’s me! I want to know more about her!” So that’s what we do really well together, add more color about her life.”
How she and Arianna are taking But Like Maybe to the next level:
“Arianna works in fashion out in New York, so last summer, she came out to L.A., and I wanted to give her the “Hollywood experience” since I grew up in the studio system. I set up a bunch of generals [ed. note: meetings] with CAA and all the agencies, and we thought the meetings were casual, but then people ended up showing interest in working with us. Now, we’re signed with CAA and are looking at going into T.V.
Instagram is so ‘instant,’ so playing the long game, like when you’re putting together a T.V. deal,  is hard. We’ve all gotten so used to instant gratification that when a deal is all “hurry up and wait,” it can test your patience [laughs].”

Why comics are more relevant than ever:
“When I first started working on the comics, I got a bunch of How-To books since I had never been a comic book reader as a kid. I still remember one of them said, “When you look at a photograph, you see the face of another, but when you look at a simple drawing, like a comic, you see yourself.” That’s when it dawned on me why I felt such a strong connection to Arianna’s drawings.”

But Like Maybe is really a coming-of-age story:
“Arianna and I write around themes, so for example, one conflict we’ve explored is the feeling when you accidentally “like” your crushes ex-girlfriend’s photo on Instagram and how in that moment it feels like World War III. Seriously, what’s worse than that? I can’t think of anything [laughs]. The main themes we focus on are panic, rejection, and overcoming tough situations. Arianna and I are both still growing up, so But Like Maybe’s story has those notes of ‘coming of age.’
Arianna and I both are all about working through discomfort and rejection- topics that no one talks about, but everyone goes through. Self-love is important, but so is knowing when not to text a guy back [laughs]. We’ll see But Like Maybe explore both bigger, universal themes, but still deal with those funny settings she’s become known for, like your Uber driver being your therapist when you’re drunk.”

How to get comfortable with being uncomfortable:
“I think there’s a lot of uncomfortableness around not knowing the answers. I can’t even count the number of times someone has asked me to do something, and I’ll agree on the spot as I furiously Google whatever it is they’re asking for [laughs]. The older I’ve gotten, though, the more I realize no one has all the answers, and the more comfortable I’ve become with asking questions. Especially when I was an assistant, there’d be situations like, “Dru, where’s my lunch?” And I’d say, “It’s almost here,” as I am in the middle of ordering it. It’s not lying per se, but more just pretending your life is not complete chaos and you have it all together, even if you don’t. But it’s OK to be chaotic! It’s OK to not know all the answers. Life is a little like a rollercoaster, and you just have to keep riding it out because it will take you where you need to go.”

Monday, April 24, 2017

TRAIN 8: THE ZOMBIE EXPRESS #1 (of 3) will be in comic book stores worldwide starting July 26 and is now available for per-order through Diamond Comic Distributors!


TRAIN 8 ZOMBIE EXPRESS #1
TRAIN 8: THE ZOMBIE EXPRESS #1 (of 3)
(W) Brian Phillipson, David Stephan (A/CA) Alex Cormack
Train 8, the famous Seattle to Chicago line, becomes ground zero as an experimental GMO virus breaks out on the crowded train during the Thanksgiving holiday, turning any infected passenger into a blood thirsty primordial. The surviving passengers are then left with the moral dilemma of stopping the train to save themselves but also letting the outbreak infect the world or being heroes by keeping the train rolling and suffering the consequences. A 3-comic mini-series based on the forthcoming major motion picture.
In Shops: Jul 26, 2017
SRP: $4.99

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Weed Magic #1 is now availbale exclusively at Drivethrucomics.com!

Click here to buy now.
Weed Magic #1

Hollywood, California. It’s 4/20 and two lovable stoners – Moe and his best friend Bunny – find themselves (and the whole city) completely dry.
When local vagabond My$tic gifts the boys a strange and exotic strain of cannabis (along with a cryptic warning), Moe and Bunny soon discover that this “magic” weed provides potent yet fleeting super-human powers of body and mind.  The love child of “Pineapple Express” and “The Greatest American Hero,” Weed Magic will delight the sober and stoned alike.  Red Eyes.  Full Bong.  Can’t Lose.

Written & Created by Brian Phillipson & Jordan Lichtman
Art by Alex Cormack